ProjectGuides

Getting Started

This guide explains how to use async-container to build basic scalable systems.

Installation

Add the gem to your project:

$ bundle add async-container

Core Concepts

async-container has several core concepts:

Containers

A container represents a set of child processes (or threads) which are doing work for you.

require 'async/container'

Console.logger.debug!

container = Async::Container.new

container.async do |task|
	task.logger.debug "Sleeping..."
	task.sleep(1)
	task.logger.debug "Waking up!"
end

Console.logger.debug "Waiting for container..."
container.wait
Console.logger.debug "Finished."

Controllers

The controller provides the life-cycle management for one or more containers of processes. It provides behaviour like starting, restarting, reloading and stopping. You can see some example implementations in Falcon. If the process running the controller receives SIGHUP it will recreate the container gracefully.

require 'async/container'

Console.logger.debug!

class Controller < Async::Container::Controller
	def setup(container)
		container.async do |task|
			while true
				Console.logger.debug("Sleeping...")
				task.sleep(1)
			end
		end
	end
end

controller = Controller.new

controller.run

# If you send SIGHUP to this process, it will recreate the container.

Signal Handling

SIGINT is the interrupt signal. The terminal sends it to the foreground process when the user presses ctrl-c. The default behavior is to terminate the process, but it can be caught or ignored. The intention is to provide a mechanism for an orderly, graceful shutdown.

SIGQUIT is the dump core signal. The terminal sends it to the foreground process when the user presses ctrl-\. The default behavior is to terminate the process and dump core, but it can be caught or ignored. The intention is to provide a mechanism for the user to abort the process. You can look at SIGINT as "user-initiated happy termination" and SIGQUIT as "user-initiated unhappy termination."

SIGTERM is the termination signal. The default behavior is to terminate the process, but it also can be caught or ignored. The intention is to kill the process, gracefully or not, but to first allow it a chance to cleanup.

SIGKILL is the kill signal. The only behavior is to kill the process, immediately. As the process cannot catch the signal, it cannot cleanup, and thus this is a signal of last resort.

SIGSTOP is the pause signal. The only behavior is to pause the process; the signal cannot be caught or ignored. The shell uses pausing (and its counterpart, resuming via SIGCONT) to implement job control.

Integration

systemd

Install a template file into /etc/systemd/system/:

# my-daemon.service
[Unit]
Description=My Daemon
AssertPathExists=/srv/

[Service]
Type=notify
WorkingDirectory=/srv/my-daemon
ExecStart=bundle exec my-daemon
Nice=5

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target